ancientpeoples
ancientpeoples:

Unfinished Stele of Amun Re
20th Dynasty, New Kingdom
Ramesside Period
c.1184-1070 BC
This unfinished stela from the Valley of the Kings depicts the barque of Amun-Re carried in procession. Below is a hymn to the god, recited by the scribe Amennakht, his son Pentwere, and the chief carpenter, Amenemope. The god was believed to give oracles during such processions by influencing the movements of the priests carrying the barque shrine. the coronation inscription on a statue in Turin, Italy , seems to indicate that such an oracle took place when the pharaoh Horemheb ascended to the throne.
(Source: The Met Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Unfinished Stele of Amun Re

20th Dynasty, New Kingdom

Ramesside Period

c.1184-1070 BC

This unfinished stela from the Valley of the Kings depicts the barque of Amun-Re carried in procession. Below is a hymn to the god, recited by the scribe Amennakht, his son Pentwere, and the chief carpenter, Amenemope. The god was believed to give oracles during such processions by influencing the movements of the priests carrying the barque shrine. the coronation inscription on a statue in Turin, Italy , seems to indicate that such an oracle took place when the pharaoh Horemheb ascended to the throne.

(Source: The Met Museum)

greek-museums

greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Nemea:

From the photographic exhibition of the museum’s numismatic collection:

  1. Silver tetradrachm from Athens (5th century B.C), with a protome of the goddess Athena and an owl with an olive branch on the reverse by the inscription (ΑΘΕ)
  2. Bronze coin of Kleonai (1/12 obol) from the last third of 4th century B.C. It features the head of Herakles wearing the skin of the Nemean lion and a wreath of wild celery on the reverse with the inscription “ΚΛΕΩ”
  3. Silver coin with Alexander the great in the guise of Herakles. At the back there is a depiction of the statue of Zeus in Olympia. It seems that references on coins to Nemea and Olympia were part of the Macedonian panhellenic policy.
  4. Silver coin of Aegina (500-480 B.C). The massive Aeginetan “turtles” with the “incuse” (mark of the striking tool) on the reverse were well known in the antiquity and well represented in Nemea.
  5. Silver coin of Sicyon from the last third of the 4th century B.C. The coin features the very characteristic dove of Sicyon on both sides.
  6. Silver coin of Corinth (525-510 B.C) featuring the front of Pegasus. On the reverse the “incuse” (the tool striking the coin into the obverse die) can be seen.
  7. Silver coin of Arkadia from the second half of the 5th century B.C. It features the olympian statue of Zeus on one side and the bead of Artemis on the reverse surrounded by the inscription “of the Arkadians”
  8. Silver coin of Argos (late 4th century B.C). This is a typical example from this period with the wolf’s head and an Alpha.
ancientpeoples
ancientpeoples:

Drum
1st Century AD
Nasca Culture, Peru
Ceramic drums with central, bulging sounding chambers were made in southern Peru at the turn of the first millennium. Among the most elaborately finished are those of Nasca style. They were surfaced with the many rich colours commonly used on Nasca ceramic vessels. A favoured form was one in which a fat-bodied figure was worked into the shape of the instrument, the rotund body spreading out equally on all sides and the legs drawn up in the front. The figure is depicted atop the wide mouth of the drum, over which a skin would have been stretched. The image is symbolically complex; a snake emerges from under the figure’s chin and a killer whale outlines each eye. The killer whales are in profile and show the “two-tone” colour differentiation normally given them in Nasca depictions. A headband is wound around the head and tied to form a hornlike projection on the forehead. In back, the figure’s hair is shown as serpents with long tongues.
(Source: The Met Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Drum

1st Century AD

Nasca Culture, Peru

Ceramic drums with central, bulging sounding chambers were made in southern Peru at the turn of the first millennium. Among the most elaborately finished are those of Nasca style. They were surfaced with the many rich colours commonly used on Nasca ceramic vessels. A favoured form was one in which a fat-bodied figure was worked into the shape of the instrument, the rotund body spreading out equally on all sides and the legs drawn up in the front. The figure is depicted atop the wide mouth of the drum, over which a skin would have been stretched. The image is symbolically complex; a snake emerges from under the figure’s chin and a killer whale outlines each eye. The killer whales are in profile and show the “two-tone” colour differentiation normally given them in Nasca depictions. A headband is wound around the head and tied to form a hornlike projection on the forehead. In back, the figure’s hair is shown as serpents with long tongues.

(Source: The Met Museum)

art-of-swords

art-of-swords:

Shasqua Sword

  • Dated: 19th century
  • Culture: Caucasian
  • Measurements: overall length 91 cm

The sword has a curved, single -and false-edged, with a Damask blade with double groove, becoming a triple one at the centre. At the first section there’s a stamp depicting and toothed crescent. The weapon has its typical hilt entirely silver-plated, with silver wire binding, engraved, gilt and nielloed with floral motifs. The wooden scabbard features red leather covering, silver mounts decorated with gilt and nielloed, floral and geometrical engravings and a band with a loop and one suspension ring.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.